Gender pay gap ‘may take 118 years to close’ – World Economic Forum

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Women are only now earning the amount that men did in 2006, data from the WEF’s Global Gender Gap report says.
Women are only now earning the amount that men did in 2006, data from the WEF’s Global Gender Gap report says.
The World Economic Forum believes it will take another 118 years – or until 2133 – until the global pay gap between men and women is finally closed.
Women are only now earning the amount that men did in 2006, data from the WEF’s Global Gender Gap report says.
It says progress on closing the gap has stalled in recent years at a time when more women are entering the workplace.
In fact, nearly a quarter of a billion more women are in the global workforce today than a decade ago.
In several countries, more women are now going to university than men but – crucially – this is not necessarily translating into more women occupying skilled roles or leadership positions.
The WEF report looks at whether men and women have the same rights and opportunities in each country in four areas: health, education, economic participation and political empowerment.

 

Nordic countries are still doing the most to close the gender gap overall, just as they were 10 years ago. They may not have achieved total equality, but Iceland (1), Norway (2), Finland (3) and Sweden (4) occupy the top four rankings out of 145 countries.
“They have the best policies in the world for families,” says the report’s lead author, Saadia Zahidi. “Their childcare systems are the best and they have the best laws on paternity, maternity and family leave.”
Not far behind, though, is Rwanda (6) which sits above the US and the UK in the index. Its high score is down to the number of female politicians active in the country.
BBC

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